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U.S. Consumer Prices Unchanged in October

Wall Street Journal U.S. News - November 20, 2014 - 9:14pm
U.S. consumer prices held steady last month, the latest sign of weak inflation at home amid soft energy prices and slow growth abroad.

'Dreamers' Vow to Fight On for Their Parents

Wall Street Journal U.S. News - November 20, 2014 - 9:11pm
Many ‘Dreamers,’ upset that their parents aren’t included in President Barack Obama’s plan, have vowed to continue the fight for further changes in immigration policy.

Police ask for help in locating missing man

Ventura County Star - Local News - November 20, 2014 - 9:01pm

The Thousand Oaks Police Department asked for the public's help in locating a missing man Thursday, officials said.

Jordan Basila, 22, has been missing since 2 a.m. Thursday. Police said he is "at risk" and was last seen in the Newbury Park area.

Basila is 5 feet 9 inches tall and 170 pounds. Anyone with information regarding his whereabouts is asked to call 911.

Police ask for help in locating missing man

Ventura County Star Top Stories - November 20, 2014 - 9:01pm

The Thousand Oaks Police Department asked for the public's help in locating a missing man Thursday, officials said.

Jordan Basila, 22, has been missing since 2 a.m. Thursday. Police said he is "at risk" and was last seen in the Newbury Park area.

Basila is 5 feet 9 inches tall and 170 pounds. Anyone with information regarding his whereabouts is asked to call 911.

University of California to Raise Tuition Despite Protests

New York Times - California News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00pm
Over the objections of students and the governor, the Board of Regents of the University of California adopted increases of up to 5 percent in each of the next five years.

Mercedes Revives the Maybach Name Again

New York Times - California News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00pm
A new, higher-end version of Mercedes-Benz’s S-Class sedan has been rebadged as the Mercedes-Maybach S600.

More Judges Question Use of Fake Drugs in Sting Cases

New York Times - California News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00pm
A number of judges have questioned a federal agency’s tactic of “stash-house stings,” saying it draws small-time criminals into major crimes.

The Lexus LF-C2 Concept: Topless, Not Convertible

New York Times - California News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00pm
The company has had a less than fruitful relationship with convertibles in the past.

Mazda Enters the Small Crossover Market With the CX-3

New York Times - California News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00pm
Compact crossovers have become strong sellers, so Mazda introduced one of its own, adding its signature driver-friendly flair to the package.

President's proposal cheers local immigrants

Ventura County Star - Local News - November 20, 2014 - 8:33pm

Cinthia Selene said it was “a gift from God” for President Barack Obama to provide relief for millions of immigrants living in the U.S. without legal permission.

“It means a lot to not only me but my family,” Selene, 24, a native of Oaxaca, Mexico, said from her Oxnard home on Thursday after the president outlined his plans in a speech.

Like countless other immigrants, Selene and her mother moved to the United States 19 years ago in search of a better life and more opportunity.

While life in the United States has been good for them in many ways, there’s also been considerable stress as they have tried but been unable to get legal permission to stay here.

“There are rules and laws that we cannot control, so we never know from one day to the next what will happen to us,” Selene said.

She said her mother is facing deportation proceedings, even though Selene’s younger sister is an American citizen.

“If you’ve been in America more than five years, if you have children who are American citizens or legal residents, if you register, pass a criminal background check and you’re willing to pay your fair share of taxes, you’ll be able to apply to stay in this country temporarily without fear of deportation,” Obama said in his announcement, something Selene and many other immigrants praised.

One of them is Mariajose Perez, 18, who moved to the U.S. when she was a young girl.

“I have been here my whole life,” said Perez, who came from El Salvador with her mother.

As with Selene, Perez has also tried and so far failed to get U.S. citizenship. Her 42-year-old mother is here illegally, although Perez has a younger sibling who is a U.S. citizen.

“It’s been very difficult for us,” said Perez, who lives in Oxnard and works five to six days a week at a restaurant, saving her money so she can enroll at Oxnard College.

Perez dreams of becoming a kindergarten or math teacher.

But she knows she will first want to legalize her residency status in the United States.

“The vast majority of immigrants are hardworking people,” she said.

She said she is involved in numerous civic causes here. Among the many benefits of one day becoming a U.S. citizen is she would have the right to vote and become even more engaged in public life in the United States.

“The United States is my country, not El Salvador,” she said.

Dayane Zuniga, 21, a Mexico City native, longs for the day when she and her family can come out of the shadows and enjoy the same rights as citizens.

“Life is hard in so many ways when you don’t have” the proper documents, Zuniga said. For example, some employers take advantage of undocumented workers, knowing there is little many of these workers can do because they are living and working here illegally.

“We pay taxes and we follow the rules,” said Zuniga, who has a work permit and driver’s license in the wake of the 2012 announcement by Obama providing relief for young immigrants brought to the country without legal permission when they were children.

Having a valid driver’s license and work permit has made a big difference in Zuniga’s life.

Zuniga is finishing her last semester at Oxnard College, where she is majoring in communications. She hopes to study next at CSU Northridge.

Like Selene and Perez, Zuniga has a younger sibling who is a U.S. citizen.

Maria Perez, 42, no relation to Mariajose Perez, moved to the United States from Mexico City 22 years ago.

She said not a day goes by when she doesn’t imagine what her life would be like if she were here legally.

“Right now, you always have to be looking over your shoulder,” the Ventura resident said. Every day when she leaves home for work, she wonders whether she will again see her two teenage children, both of whom are U.S. citizens.

“I always worry about them,” she said, adding, “I am here because I want to give them a better future.”

She cleans houses to make ends meet.

She wanted to become a phlebotomist, but she gave up on the idea after being told she needed a Social Security number to enroll in the training. She instead studied accounting.

“We are not criminals,” she said. “We are just fighting for a better life, for opportunity.”

President's proposal cheers local immigrants

Ventura County Star Top Stories - November 20, 2014 - 8:33pm

Cinthia Selene said it was “a gift from God” for President Barack Obama to provide relief for millions of immigrants living in the U.S. without legal permission.

“It means a lot to not only me but my family,” Selene, 24, a native of Oaxaca, Mexico, said from her Oxnard home on Thursday after the president outlined his plans in a speech.

Like countless other immigrants, Selene and her mother moved to the United States 19 years ago in search of a better life and more opportunity.

While life in the United States has been good for them in many ways, there’s also been considerable stress as they have tried but been unable to get legal permission to stay here.

“There are rules and laws that we cannot control, so we never know from one day to the next what will happen to us,” Selene said.

She said her mother is facing deportation proceedings, even though Selene’s younger sister is an American citizen.

“If you’ve with been in America more than five years, if you have children who are American citizens or illegal residents, if you register, pass a criminal background check and you’re willing to pay your fair share of taxes, you’ll be able to apply to stay in this country temporarily without fear of deportation,” Obama said in his announcement, something Selene and many other immigrants praised.

One of them is Mariajose Perez, 18, who moved to the U.S. when she was a young girl.

“I have been here my whole life,” said Perez, who came from El Salvador with her mother.

As with Selene, Perez has also tried and so far failed to get U.S. citizenship. Her 42-year-old mother is here illegally, although Perez has a younger sibling who is a U.S. citizen.

“It’s been very difficult for us,” said Perez, who lives in Oxnard and works five to six days a week at a restaurant, saving her money so she can enroll at Oxnard College.

Perez dreams of becoming a kindergarten or math teacher.

But she knows she will first want to legalize her residency status in the United States.

“The vast majority of immigrants are hardworking people,” she said.

She said she is involved in numerous civic causes here. Among the many benefits of one day becoming a U.S. citizen is she would have the right to vote and become even more engaged in public life in the United States.

“The United States is my country, not El Salvador,” she said.

Dayane Zuniga, 21, a Mexico City native, longs for the day when she and her family can come out of the shadows and enjoy the same rights as citizens.

“Life is hard in so many ways when you don’t have” the proper documents, Zuniga said. For example, some employers take advantage of undocumented workers, knowing there is little many of these workers can do because they are living and working here illegally.

“We pay taxes and we follow the rules,” said Zuniga, who has a work permit and driver’s license in the wake of the 2012 announcement by Obama providing relief for young immigrants brought to the country without legal permission when they were children.

Having a valid driver’s license and work permit has made a big difference in Zuniga’s life.

Zuniga is finishing her last semester at Oxnard College, where she is majoring in communications. She hopes to study next at CSU Northridge.

Like Selene and Perez, Zuniga has a younger sibling who is a U.S. citizen.

Maria Perez, 42, no relation to Mariajose Perez, moved to the United States from Mexico City 22 years ago.

She said not a day goes by when she doesn’t imagine what her life would be like if she were here legally.

“Right now, you always have to be looking over your shoulder,” the Ventura resident said. Every day when she leaves home for work, she wonders whether she will again see her two teenage children, both of whom are U.S. citizens.

“I always worry about them,” she said, adding, “I am here because I want to give them a better future.”

She cleans houses to make ends meet.

She wanted to become a phlebotomist, but she gave up on the idea after being told she needed a Social Security number to enroll in the training. She instead studied accounting.

“We are not criminals,” she said. “We are just fighting for a better life, for opportunity.”

Police arrest suspect in Simi Valley burglaries

Ventura County Star - Local News - November 20, 2014 - 8:13pm

Police said they arrested a Simi Valley woman in connection with residential burglary after a search warrant was served at her home Thursday.

Teresa Housley, 47, was identified as the suspect in several residential burglaries that occurred in June in the 4500 block of Apricot Road, police said.

Detectives served a search warrant at Housley's residence in the 2600 block of Kadota Street and found property identified as stolen in the June burglaries, police said. Authorities said they also found $20,000 worth of jewelry stolen Wednesday night from a casino in Primm, Nevada.

Housley was booked into county jail in connection with two counts of residential burglary and felony possession of stolen property, authorities said.

Police arrest suspect in Simi Valley burglaries

Ventura County Star Top Stories - November 20, 2014 - 8:13pm

Police said they arrested a Simi Valley woman in connection with residential burglary after a search warrant was served at her home Thursday.

Teresa Housley, 47, was identified as the suspect in several residential burglaries that occurred in June in the 4500 block of Apricot Road, police said.

Detectives served a search warrant at Housley's residence in the 2600 block of Kadota Street and found property identified as stolen in the June burglaries, police said. Authorities said they also found $20,000 worth of jewelry stolen Wednesday night from a casino in Primm, Nevada.

Housley was booked into county jail in connection with two counts of residential burglary and felony possession of stolen property, authorities said.

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