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UC/Cal Application Help at the Ojai Library

UC/CAL STATE APPLICATION HELP

Mondays 5:30pm - 8:00pm October through November

College Counselor Judy Oberlander will be at the Ojai Library to answer your questions about the UC/CAL applications.  With 28 years of experience Judy is well qualified to help you and your future college student navigate the admissions process.

Ojai Library     * * *   (805) 646-1639

A busy weekend at Foster Library!

Friday, Oct 11th

7-8 p.m.

Saturday, Oct 12th

5-6:30 p.m.

Sunday, Oct 13th

4:30-6 p.m.

  • Author talks with John Mulhall
  • Reading and book signing of Geddy's Moon
  • Bird watching
  • Basics of bird identification in an interactive workshop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about any of these events, call the library at 648-2716!

The ABC's of Building an Opera at Foster Library

 

 

Foster Library Presents:

The ABC's of Building an Opera

A special talk with the director of the Santa Barbara Opera

Get a backstage look at what it takes to build and direct these magnificent productions!

6:30 p.m. on October 4th

ABC's of building an opera at Foster Library

 

Foster Library Presents:

The ABC's of Building an Opera

A special talk with the General Director of the Santa Barbara Opera

Get a backstage look at what it takes to build and direct these magnificent productions!

6:30 p.m. on October 4th

Ojai Library Presents: Local Author Susan Salguero

Susan Salguero will read from her new book

Lighten the Load;

Tips and Tools to Ease Aging, Dying, Grieving

Saturday October 5th at 2pm

at the Ojai Library

After a life altering three years in an Indian asram, Ms. Salguero became a bereavement and hospice counselor.  Her book is a wealth of wisdom that comes from 27 years counseling, facilitating support groups, teaching hospice volunteers and public education courses.  Lighten the Load offers tips and tools for getting your affairs in order and making yourself available to help others in distress.

Drawing Manga

 

For some people, it’s not enough to just read manga (or graphic novels for that matter). They want to draw manga as well. Now, if you’re like me that might be a bit of a challenge. I can’t draw a straight line with a ruler and my circles have always been more like ovals, but I was willing to give it a try. So, I decided to find myself a book on drawing manga, to see if someone as artistically challenged as myself could actually do it.

The book I chose was Manga for the Beginner by Christopher Hart. I know there are quite a few books like these out there in the world, so you’ll have lots to choose from. Now, to make this review fair, I actually attempted to draw at least one of the pictures in the book. I figure if I’m going to write a review about drawing manga, I should put my money where my mouth is. For someone not inclined to draw, I thought I did pretty good. I followed the basic guidelines for drawing a face and, using the picture as a reference, it began to take shape. 

Now, to be honest, it sometimes felt like the book jumped ahead a few steps, going from drawing a basic body shape to having a completed character in costume, but then I’ve noticed that most books on drawing manga do that.  Still, some of the basic steps were included, and it was enough to make me comfortable with the drawing I was making. Now, I won’t be bringing out any new manga anytime soon, but I can at least say that I tried it, and that might just be enough for me.

Now, for those who have stayed ‘til the end… 

The reason I’m focusing on drawing manga is that Foster Library will be having a minicon of sorts on October 26 and it will include an art contest. So, if you like to draw and are brave enough to try, you can pick up an application (with contest rules) at the library. Deadline is October 22.

Heather, the Graphic Novel Goddess

"A Place at the Table" at Oak View Library October 5th

In an effort to engage our community in a conversation about hunger, obesity, food insecurity, and the reforms needed to address the problem, the Book to Action group of the Oak View Library is inviting local residents to take their place in the fight to end hunger and ensure that all children and families have access to healthy, affordable foods.

The Oak View Library will host a community screening of "A Place at the Table" on Saturday, October 5

The critically acclaimed documentary A Place at the Table, directed by Kristi Jacobson and Lori Silverbush, examines the crisis of food security, hunger, obesity and food access. The film will be screened at 6pm at the Oak View Park and Resource Center

A pre-screening reception begins at 5:30pm with refreshments. Admission is free; however, any donation of nutritious, non-perishable boxed or canned food will be gladly accepted.

 “This screening is a great opportunity to bring the community together to discuss what’s behind this food crisis and what might be done to address it,” said Oak View Librarian Sharon Dykstra, “Our library’s Book to Action group, after viewing the documentary and reading its companion book, thought a community screening would be the best way to share their newfound knowledge and also use this opportunity to raise food donations, as well.” 

Interested in attending the screening? Please RSVP to the library by calling 649-1523. 

Butterflies!

Ventura is host to a myriad number of butterflies.  Most of us are familiar with the Monarch butterfly, but did you know that there are dozens of different butterflies that call Ventura County home?  Foster library has many Butterfly Books to help you identify our winged neighbors.

Resident Photographer Aleta Rodriguez

MORE SILLY SYMPHONIES

MORE SILLY SYMPHONIES - Two-Disc DVD Set, Foster Children's Section
 
A title in Leonard Maltin's series of Walt Disney TREASURES DVD sets is "Disney Rarities" but Foster has another Maltin rarity in the 2-disc (now out-of-print) MORE SILLY SYMPHONIES. This is a collection of now-rare short cartoons, mostly from the 1930s which, along with the more celebrated Mickey Mouse shorts, laid the groundwork for the first features and the Disney mega-empire of today.
 
Collectively the shorts may also be seen as a history of early 20th century cinema, embracing innovations such as sound, color, and precise muscial synchronization (The 1930s were an era of remarkable technical progress in Hollywood).
 
The early Symphonies (like the first Mickeys) are in black-and-white, and were launched by SKELETON DANCE in 1929 when Disney wanted to showcase music more than was possible in the Mickey shorts. Though SKELETON DANCE is not in this collection, HELL'S BELLS, a somewhat bizarre short from 1929, provides a key example of the crude but energetic style of this period. Also from 1929 is THE MERRY DWARFS, a key example of early musical camp.
 
The early 1930s ushered in the first Technicolor shorts. The Sillys drew on a variety of source material from classic fairy and folk tales to myths and legends. THE GODDESS OF SPRING (1934), based on the Greek myth of Persephone, is a virtual mini-opera in which all the dialogue is sung. MOTHER GOOSE GOES HOLLYWOOD, from 1938, features movie star caricatures which adult movie buffs (of a certain age) will find amusing.
 
But there's a variety of silliness, amazingly detailed, ground-breaking animation, and excellent music to be discovered by kids and adults alike in this marvelous set. And be sure to listen to the commentaries, some of which are voiced-over by yours truly.
 
Staff member - Ross
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