Blogs

Join the Library Big Read!

Ventura County Library features Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth in both eBook and audiobook formats.  The Library Big Read starts today, September 16th and runs through Monday, September 30th.

During this two-week reading period, Book 1 from the Nancy Clancy series will be available for every customer that wishes to read it - no holds, no waitlists! You can find the Library Big Read book in OverDrive, found our eLibrary under eBooks and/or eAudiobooks.

Fancy Nancy author, Jane O’Connor, is participating in a live 30-minute chat with readers on Tuesday, September 24 at 6pm PDT. You may join the discussion by visiting this page.

Fancy Nancy creator Jane O’Connor brings us back to the glamorous world of our favorite fancy girl. Nancy Clancy may be a bit older and more sophisticated, but she hasn’t lost her love for fancy words, outrageous fashion and dramatic flair.

Come read with us!

In memory of 9/11

In May of 1987, I visited family back east.  We decided to take a quick trip to New York City.  We took the Staten Island ferry back to New Jersey and I was able to take some pictures of the World Trade Center from the ferry.  At that time I had no way of knowing that it would be the last time I would ever see the twin towers.


On this anniversary of 9/11 I offer these images in memoriam to those who lost their lives that day and to the memory of a skyline that has changed forever.  Foster Library has many books about 9/11 if you are interested in finding out more about the heroes and events of that day.

Resident Photographer – Aleta A. Rodriguez

FosterCon!

For those looking for something fun and different to do for the Halloween season, you need look no further than our beloved E. P. Foster Library.  On October 26, Foster Library will have its first ever FosterCon Mini Comic Festival. While not quite on the grand scale of the San Diego Comic Con or the Central Coast Comic Con (which was recently held right here in Ventura), our event will still be fun and have something for all ages.

Starting when the doors open at 10:00 and lasting through the evening, our FosterCon will have airbrush tattoos, candy sushi, and coloring for the kids, both art and costume contests, local comic stores selling many wonderful things, local comic artists, a photo booth, and a graphic novel book display. On Sunday, there will be Wii gaming for the teens and a showing of The Avengers, open to all ages. But the part I’m most excited about is our very special guest speaker for Saturday evening. It is none other than Sergio Aragones. Now, if you don’t know who he is, then you must never have read Mad magazine or Groo the Wanderer. He is truly a kind man who has graciously agreed to be our big speaker for this event. He even supplied artwork for event flyer. I’m so excited! I hope you will be too.

For those wanting to participate in the art and/or costume contest, applications will be available at the library, online, and at local comic book shops within the next week. Deadlines and rules will be included for both.

So, if you want to have fun and can’t wait for Halloween, stop by the E. P. Foster Library on October 26. I’ll see you there. Bring your cape.

Heather, the Graphic Novel Goddess

Trying to sort facts and opinions on an issue? We've got a database (or 2) for that!

 

Ventura County Library is pleased to announce the availability of Opposing Viewpoints in Context and Global Issues in Context under several subject headings in the Ventura County eLibrary

“Adding Opposing Viewpoints in Context and Global Issues in Context is one more step in our efforts to deliver relevant, timely content to our community members, whether they are at home, work or on the road,” says Jackie Griffin, Director of Ventura County Library.

Opposing Viewpoints in Context is an engaging online experience for those seeking contextual information and opinions on hundreds of today's hottest social issues. 

Global Issues in Context offers international viewpoints on a broad spectrum of global issues, topics, and current events. 

Check them out and see what you think!

Teens Teach Tech at the Ojai Library

Take control of your technology!

Bring your iPhone, iPad, Android, Nook, Kindle or Smartphone to the Ojai Library and let one of our helpful teen volunteers demystify your device.

Get the help you need:

Every Saturday at 11am * * * Ojai Library   * * * (805) 646-1639

Say Cheese!

For transparency’s sake I’ll get to this issue right out front, I have prematurely partaken in the consumption of the pickled orange cauliflower, I was to wait till September 8th, but as Oscar Wilde said, “the only thing I cannot resist is temptation,” I couldn’t, and it was delicious. Crunchy, spicy, garlicky and picklely all combined, just wonderful! Pickling is a must for all serious “David’s dish” devotees.

I guess I have been on a bit of a tear for making fermented food stuffs, so the next logical step would have to be cheese making. I just want cheese to be another fermented food that I can endlessly talk about in front of my co-workers and either have them admit to making it or be encouraged to make some cheese, I know for admitting this a couple of gold stars will be taken away, but it’s the truth.

The cheese making was almost stopped in its tracks for I left the recipe book at work. What would I do? I couldn’t wing it, I needed a source in the form of a book, right? Then, I remembered my Achilles heel that I could turn into strength, the library databases! I’ve heard it said countless times the library databases are our friend’s and by Jove, if this friendship leads to cheese making I’m all for it!

After getting to the E.P Foster Library webpage a few clicks on the computer and staring me in the face was Zinio digital magazines, it’s a program that offers tons of free magazines, including the March 16th Food Network magazine, the cheese issue! The magazine displays beautifully on my tiny iPod. On page 68 of the digital magazine there’s a great recipe for fresh ricotta, a simple well illustrated no fuss no muss recipe. The recipe calls for milk, heavy cream, kosher salt, fresh lemon juice and distilled white vinegar. A little boiling, some draining, and little thinking about the nursery rhythm “Little Miss Muffet” and you are done. You are now officially a cheese maker! Please explore our information rich databases, you won’t be sorry!

*****David’s dish

Check out the book at Foster Library, or put a hold on it - we will send it to you!

https://www.rbdigital.com/venturaca/zinio

Heart Print

CLASSIC MARITIME FISH STORIES (The ones that got away)

        Two of my favorite fish stories are Melville’s MOBY DICK and Hemmingway’s THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA. Call me Ishmael, but there is a romantic essence to the dangers of sea faring. And these two authors knew how to spin a good yarn that included hubris and folly. Hemmingway won the Pulitzer for his work in 1953, while Moby Dick is considered one of the finest pieces of American Literature, sometimes given to the moniker, “The Great American Novel”.

     Both Ahab and the old man are, in a sense, monomaniacs. They are both so single minded in the pursuit of their objects that they become oblivious to every thing else. It creates pride, which leads to each of the character’s own downfall. Both of them die before ever obtaining what they truly seek. And neither one ever perceives the inherent folly of his own actions.

    The Sea is a great equalizer for American writers, because the United States is situated along three shores, the Atlantic, Pacific and  Gulf Coasts. Alaska has the most shoreline; and Hawaii is surrounded by the Pacific. The vastness of it creates a canvas upon which a writer can paint many portraits of human travail. And it serves to facilitate the metaphor of how small we are in comparison to nature-that it cannot be tamed… and yet, we can become extinct. This is the overwhelming theme in these two stories. I will begin with Melville here, and then review Hemmingway later.

MOBY DICK By Herman Melville.

    “Call me Ishmael”, is one of the great opening lines of any novel, and sets the tone for 1st person narration. This is the account by a new hire of the great whaling vessel, The Pequod and the man who was its captain, the elusive Ahab. The story is rife with Biblical reference, particularly about the wages of sin and the elusiveness of redemption.

     Ahab walks the deck alone at night to the sound of his peg leg pounding along the gang boards. It is a reminder to those below who have sailed with him many times, about how he came to lose his leg. The Great White Whale, Moby Dick, a giant albino Sperm whale remains the single occupancy of his consciousness. For it was this whale which caused him to wear a peg. And it is this whale that drives him on each voyage of killing and retrieving whales as a business. So much so, that he hammers a gold doubloon to the main mast and offers it to any scalawag who spots the Great White Whale on each voyage.

     The vestigial plot is of the train wreck variety, even though Ahab does not appear before chapter 28 of 135 chapters. There is no conflict moving toward a crisis in Moby Dick, because the crisis is long past, the battle for the soul lost in a summary flashback by the delirium that followed the castrating bite that took off Ahab’s leg. The one emotion that is returned to him is vengeance. Ahab is now shaped in an unalterable mould. The die is cast. All that’s left is the denouement with all the characters-save the narrator, Ishmael -dragged inexorably toward destruction.

     Melville reads the captain as a demagogue, blinded by his own profane quest. Ahab manipulates his crew, squandering his investor’s money and his crew’s lives to satisfy his immoral agenda-piloting his ship toward a doomed conflict with a murderous, uncontrollable, unstoppable monster.

    The whiteness of the whale is “the pallor of the dead” and the “shroud in which we wrap them”. But it is also the most meaningful symbol of spiritual things. Even Que Qui, the tattooed harpooner from the South Pacific who befriends Ishmael, sees in the rolling of some whale bones, the prophecy of their deaths. He becomes immobilized in a spiritual trance knowing the ultimate fate of the ship.

   Eventually, the Pequod rendezvous with the Great White Whale and Ahab takes his vengeance upon it, after the whale broadsides the ship leaving it to sink. He leaps upon the creature with a harpoon and gets caught up in the rope, dragged under by the whale, but not before inflicting it with the harpoon. When he appears on the surface again, his body is tangled in the web of rope, with only a free arm loose. It waves with the motion of the monster, as if beckoning the crew to follow their captain in finishing the job he no longer can. But the ship sinks beneath the waves, leaving only Ishmael as a survivor to tell the story.

     To keep the whale oil burning in a rich man’s lap required the delicate maneuvering of a crew whose demographic diversity predicted America’s future. Caucasians, Indians, African Americans, various islanders are all, as Melville would write, “ federated along one keel”. A misdirected melting pot, it sails on under a man divided and seared by the conflagration raging inside him. Its as if Melville is beckoning us to believe that we are a nation, a species, full of diversity and also of greed and pride, Hubris, ever poised on self-destruction. It could be read as a cautionary tale whose ending he saw as unavoidable extinction.

-Resident Philosopher Doug Taylor

September is Library Card Sign-Up Month!

Ojai Library Presents: Local Author Doug Parker

 

Ogden Nash: The Life and Work of America's Laureate of Light Verse

"The book I would rather find in a hotel drawer than the Gideon Bible"

                                      -- Mark Russell, humorist

Doug Parker will discribe his experiences writing his
acclaimed biography of Ogden Nash
at the Ojai Library on Saturday September 28 at 2pm.

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