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Trying to sort facts and opinions on an issue? We've got a database (or 2) for that!

 

Ventura County Library is pleased to announce the availability of Opposing Viewpoints in Context and Global Issues in Context under several subject headings in the Ventura County eLibrary

“Adding Opposing Viewpoints in Context and Global Issues in Context is one more step in our efforts to deliver relevant, timely content to our community members, whether they are at home, work or on the road,” says Jackie Griffin, Director of Ventura County Library.

Opposing Viewpoints in Context is an engaging online experience for those seeking contextual information and opinions on hundreds of today's hottest social issues. 

Global Issues in Context offers international viewpoints on a broad spectrum of global issues, topics, and current events. 

Check them out and see what you think!

Teens Teach Tech at the Ojai Library

Take control of your technology!

Bring your iPhone, iPad, Android, Nook, Kindle or Smartphone to the Ojai Library and let one of our helpful teen volunteers demystify your device.

Get the help you need:

Every Saturday at 11am * * * Ojai Library   * * * (805) 646-1639

Say Cheese!

For transparency’s sake I’ll get to this issue right out front, I have prematurely partaken in the consumption of the pickled orange cauliflower, I was to wait till September 8th, but as Oscar Wilde said, “the only thing I cannot resist is temptation,” I couldn’t, and it was delicious. Crunchy, spicy, garlicky and picklely all combined, just wonderful! Pickling is a must for all serious “David’s dish” devotees.

I guess I have been on a bit of a tear for making fermented food stuffs, so the next logical step would have to be cheese making. I just want cheese to be another fermented food that I can endlessly talk about in front of my co-workers and either have them admit to making it or be encouraged to make some cheese, I know for admitting this a couple of gold stars will be taken away, but it’s the truth.

The cheese making was almost stopped in its tracks for I left the recipe book at work. What would I do? I couldn’t wing it, I needed a source in the form of a book, right? Then, I remembered my Achilles heel that I could turn into strength, the library databases! I’ve heard it said countless times the library databases are our friend’s and by Jove, if this friendship leads to cheese making I’m all for it!

After getting to the E.P Foster Library webpage a few clicks on the computer and staring me in the face was Zinio digital magazines, it’s a program that offers tons of free magazines, including the March 16th Food Network magazine, the cheese issue! The magazine displays beautifully on my tiny iPod. On page 68 of the digital magazine there’s a great recipe for fresh ricotta, a simple well illustrated no fuss no muss recipe. The recipe calls for milk, heavy cream, kosher salt, fresh lemon juice and distilled white vinegar. A little boiling, some draining, and little thinking about the nursery rhythm “Little Miss Muffet” and you are done. You are now officially a cheese maker! Please explore our information rich databases, you won’t be sorry!

*****David’s dish

Check out the book at Foster Library, or put a hold on it - we will send it to you!

https://www.rbdigital.com/venturaca/zinio

Heart Print

CLASSIC MARITIME FISH STORIES (The ones that got away)

        Two of my favorite fish stories are Melville’s MOBY DICK and Hemmingway’s THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA. Call me Ishmael, but there is a romantic essence to the dangers of sea faring. And these two authors knew how to spin a good yarn that included hubris and folly. Hemmingway won the Pulitzer for his work in 1953, while Moby Dick is considered one of the finest pieces of American Literature, sometimes given to the moniker, “The Great American Novel”.

     Both Ahab and the old man are, in a sense, monomaniacs. They are both so single minded in the pursuit of their objects that they become oblivious to every thing else. It creates pride, which leads to each of the character’s own downfall. Both of them die before ever obtaining what they truly seek. And neither one ever perceives the inherent folly of his own actions.

    The Sea is a great equalizer for American writers, because the United States is situated along three shores, the Atlantic, Pacific and  Gulf Coasts. Alaska has the most shoreline; and Hawaii is surrounded by the Pacific. The vastness of it creates a canvas upon which a writer can paint many portraits of human travail. And it serves to facilitate the metaphor of how small we are in comparison to nature-that it cannot be tamed… and yet, we can become extinct. This is the overwhelming theme in these two stories. I will begin with Melville here, and then review Hemmingway later.

MOBY DICK By Herman Melville.

    “Call me Ishmael”, is one of the great opening lines of any novel, and sets the tone for 1st person narration. This is the account by a new hire of the great whaling vessel, The Pequod and the man who was its captain, the elusive Ahab. The story is rife with Biblical reference, particularly about the wages of sin and the elusiveness of redemption.

     Ahab walks the deck alone at night to the sound of his peg leg pounding along the gang boards. It is a reminder to those below who have sailed with him many times, about how he came to lose his leg. The Great White Whale, Moby Dick, a giant albino Sperm whale remains the single occupancy of his consciousness. For it was this whale which caused him to wear a peg. And it is this whale that drives him on each voyage of killing and retrieving whales as a business. So much so, that he hammers a gold doubloon to the main mast and offers it to any scalawag who spots the Great White Whale on each voyage.

     The vestigial plot is of the train wreck variety, even though Ahab does not appear before chapter 28 of 135 chapters. There is no conflict moving toward a crisis in Moby Dick, because the crisis is long past, the battle for the soul lost in a summary flashback by the delirium that followed the castrating bite that took off Ahab’s leg. The one emotion that is returned to him is vengeance. Ahab is now shaped in an unalterable mould. The die is cast. All that’s left is the denouement with all the characters-save the narrator, Ishmael -dragged inexorably toward destruction.

     Melville reads the captain as a demagogue, blinded by his own profane quest. Ahab manipulates his crew, squandering his investor’s money and his crew’s lives to satisfy his immoral agenda-piloting his ship toward a doomed conflict with a murderous, uncontrollable, unstoppable monster.

    The whiteness of the whale is “the pallor of the dead” and the “shroud in which we wrap them”. But it is also the most meaningful symbol of spiritual things. Even Que Qui, the tattooed harpooner from the South Pacific who befriends Ishmael, sees in the rolling of some whale bones, the prophecy of their deaths. He becomes immobilized in a spiritual trance knowing the ultimate fate of the ship.

   Eventually, the Pequod rendezvous with the Great White Whale and Ahab takes his vengeance upon it, after the whale broadsides the ship leaving it to sink. He leaps upon the creature with a harpoon and gets caught up in the rope, dragged under by the whale, but not before inflicting it with the harpoon. When he appears on the surface again, his body is tangled in the web of rope, with only a free arm loose. It waves with the motion of the monster, as if beckoning the crew to follow their captain in finishing the job he no longer can. But the ship sinks beneath the waves, leaving only Ishmael as a survivor to tell the story.

     To keep the whale oil burning in a rich man’s lap required the delicate maneuvering of a crew whose demographic diversity predicted America’s future. Caucasians, Indians, African Americans, various islanders are all, as Melville would write, “ federated along one keel”. A misdirected melting pot, it sails on under a man divided and seared by the conflagration raging inside him. Its as if Melville is beckoning us to believe that we are a nation, a species, full of diversity and also of greed and pride, Hubris, ever poised on self-destruction. It could be read as a cautionary tale whose ending he saw as unavoidable extinction.

-Resident Philosopher Doug Taylor

September is Library Card Sign-Up Month!

Ojai Library Presents: Local Author Doug Parker

 

Ogden Nash: The Life and Work of America's Laureate of Light Verse

"The book I would rather find in a hotel drawer than the Gideon Bible"

                                      -- Mark Russell, humorist

Doug Parker will discribe his experiences writing his
acclaimed biography of Ogden Nash
at the Ojai Library on Saturday September 28 at 2pm.

Ojai Library Presents Local Author Daniela Alriati

   
   
Daniella Alraiti leerá de su novela
Sabado Sept. 7, 2pm.
 
at the
Daniella will be reading from her
first novel
 Invierno en La Habana.

Simply Organic

I went far afield this week in my quest become a legend of the cookery world. A brightly colored book caught my eye, please spare me the, “Don’t judge a book by the cover”, because I do! I believe I’ve just got myself in a pickle by stating the former, but that’s fine because this adventure delves into pickling.

Simply Organic: a cookbook for sustainable, seasonal, and local ingredients, by Jesse Ziff Cool, is the book I fancy this week, and it’s not a book primarily about pickling, in fact, there is only one pickling recipe in the book.  The cookbook possesses a wonderful connection to seasonal relationships with food it begins with spring recipes and ends with winter recipes. Mindful eating is discussed in the book and not imposing our eating believes on others, being respectful of food choices of others. I would love to spend a year strictly following the recipes in the cookbook. It just has so many great recipes and so much insight to the world of healthy food.
 
I’ll stop gushing and get down to the nitty-gritty of pickling cauliflower. Yes, I chose the Pickled Cauliflower recipe, orange cauliflower, because we all know “the Dish” must cook with panache! The preparation and ingredients are simple, just steam some cauliflower then add vinegar, garlic, jalapenos and a few other ingredients then your set. The whole deal took about 20 minutes, no problem. The results, the pickled cauliflower will be ready in two weeks or so, I’ll post them next time. I highly recommend this cookbook!

 *****David’s Dish

Check out the book at Foster Library, or put a hold on it - we will send it to you!
If there are any cookbooks in Foster Library’s collection that you would like me to try out, please leave the title on our Facebook page and I’ll get cooking.

San Buenaventura Mission

Mission San Buenaventura is a Spanish mission founded in 1782 by the Franciscan order in present-day Ventura, California. It was the ninth and final Spanish mission established in California by Father Junípero Serra. Named for Saint Bonaventure, the mission is the namesake of the city of Ventura (officially "San Buenaventura") and Ventura County.

In 1793, the first church burned down. In 1893, Father Cyprian Rubio "modernized" the interior of the church, painting over the original artwork; when he finished, almost nothing remained of the old church. New priests restored the church to its original style in 1957. Today all that remains of the original Mission is the church and its garden. Services are still held in the parish church. A small museum sits at the Mission with displays of Chumash Indian artifacts and mission-era items.

To find out more, Foster Library has books on the Missions of California as well as information about Father Junipero Serra.

Resident Photographer - Aleta Rodriguez

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