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The Month of the Military Child

In 1986, Secretary of Defense Caspar W. Weinberger designated each April as “The Month of the Military Child” to celebrate the contributions and inspiration of military children. There are approximately two million military children ranging in age from newborn to 18 years old; 1.3 million military children are school-aged. April is a time to acknowledge the strength and resilience of children who grow up in a unique and often changing environment and to reinforce that the health and well-being of military children contributes to the strength of our Armed Forces as a whole.

As the daughter of a lifetime Army veteran, I know how challenging, as well as rewarding, it can be to grow up as an “Army Brat.” We only saw our extended family in between deployments, if we had enough time. The longest time I ever lived in any one place was three-and-a-half years. I attended three different high schools in three years. This was “normal” for us. I look at the photos from my childhood and I see loving parents who did their best to create a home, no matter where we lived. As long as we were together, we were home.

Military children have a unique heritage and may not always understand civilian life. When asked about our “hometown” we may choose a location where we particularly enjoyed living, the place we lived the longest, or one of our parents’ hometowns. Today’s military children have different dilemmas to deal with than when I was growing up. My mom was a WAC, but she left the service when she married my dad. Today, many military children may have both parents in the service.

Ventura County is home to two military bases, Pt. Mugu Naval Air Station and Port Hueneme Navy Base. There are many families who make use of our libraries, including E.P. Foster. We have a number of materials available that focus on military children and their families.

Resident Photographer Aleta A. Rodriguez

April Staff Picks!

    Each month, our staff sends in a list of their favorite books, DVDs, and children's materials they recommend.

See something you like? When viewing the list, click on the "Check Library Catalog" link to be taken directly to our catalog. Then, sign in and place a hold request to have the item brought to your local library for pick up!

Can't remember to check the list? You can sign up to receive this and many other book recommendation lists directly into your email box at our "Newsletter & Booklists" page found under Special Interests (on the left side of this page) > Books & Reading > Staff Picks.

Enjoy!

2014 WordFest at the Ojai Library

 

2014 Ojai WordFest

Ojai's Literary Festival

April 10 - 14 [Event Flyer]

 Eight FREE Events at Ojai Library

All WordFest events described at ojaiwordfest.com

Haiku Poetry Contest @ Foster Library

Come celebrate National Haiku Day with E.P. Foster Library by entering our Haiku Poetry Contest! You can enter at the library or by visiting this link between April 2 and April 16.

Entries should follow the traditional haiku structure: three lines of five, seven, and five syllables. There will be prizes for the winners! Call or visit the library for more details.

For inspiration, check out last year’s winners!

Book Appetit: Sunflowers on the Square

Join us at E.P. Foster Library on Saturday, April 5, in the Topping Room for our next Book Appetit event!

The owner of Sunflowers on the Square, a local Ventura bakery, will be at the event to provide tips on creating delicious treats as well as give a live baking demonstration!

It all starts at 5 p.m. Call or visit the library for details!

Ojai Library Temporary Closure

 

 

Ojai Library will be closed Thursday April 3

through Sunday April 6.

Book drops will be open and emptied daily.

New carpeting is being installed in the library.

Questions? call 646-1639

The Big Read @ Foster: Captain Luis Carlos Montalván

On April 15, 2014, come by E.P. Foster Library to listen to a talk by Captain Luis Carlos Montalván, author of Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him.

Captain Montalván will be discussing the “war after the war,” the human-animal bond, and an inspirational story of healing and hope.

The event is at 6 p.m. in the Topping Room. We look forward to seeing you there!

The Veterans Home of California—Ventura

On March 7, 2014, Foster Library opened its Veterans Resource Center inside the library. Its purpose is to assist veterans in finding resources they may not be aware are available. The Veterans Home of California—Ventura, which opened in December 2010, is just one of the resources available to veterans who may need assisted-living accommodations. The Veterans Home provides California veterans with a living environment that protects their dignity and contributes to their sense of self-reliance as well as self-worth.


As part of its commitment to provide materials to educate and enlighten, E. P. Foster Library has many items available for veterans.


Resident Photographer Aleta A. Rodriguez

Avenue Library Art Quilt Display

Ventura artist Sara Lee will exhibit her beautiful
embellished quilts at Avenue Library.

 

Each of Sara Lee's quilts require 40 to 60 hours of hand work. 

Inspired by books, magazines and even catalogs, Sara Lee devotes 4-5 hours each day to piecing each quilt, quilting, then artfully applying beads, tatted pieces and embroidery.

Sara Lee is a self-taught needlework artist who began by using quilting books from the library. 

These one of a kind quilts will be on display through April 25 at Avenue Library.

Novelties: “Sycamore Row,” by John Grisham

In 1989, John Grisham’s first novel, A Time to Kill, was released. Though it initially had a modest showing, the novel ultimately became a best-seller, even being made into a feature film in 1996. Twenty-four years later we have Sycamore Row (2013), Grisham’s latest offering, which reunites readers with the time, place, and familiar characters from his incredible debut.

A master of the legal thriller, Grisham is also returning to the subject of race relations in Sycamore Row. Jake Brigance is a Mississippi lawyer facing an interesting case. An elderly and extremely wealthy man has hanged himself after penning an alternate will that cuts off his immediate family and leaves the bulk of his estate to his African-American housekeeper. Brigance has been chosen to ensure that the will is faithfully executed—largely due to the reputation he earned in A Time to Kill—which proves difficult once the deceased’s next-of-kin learn they have been passed-over. In working the case he partners with several familiar faces, including Lucien Wilbanks and Harry Rex Vonner from A Time to KillSycamore Row’s place on the New York Times Best Seller List testifies to Grisham’s ability to write complex legal fiction in a way that is engaging and leaves the reader ready for more.
If you can’t get your hands on Sycamore Row right away, consider looking into The Reversal (2010), by Michael Connelly. Being a NoveList Plus read-alike for Grisham’s latest, the two have a lot in common: they are both legal thrillers, they both have fast-paced, suspenseful storylines, and they both revisit a recurring character from their author’s extended universe. Mickey Haller is a defense attorney, first introduced to readers in The Lincoln Lawyer (2005). In The Reversal, however, Haller is called upon to join the prosecution for a case involving a man whose conviction for killing a young girl has been recently overturned. Haller agrees to work on the retrial along with his ex-wife and half-brother, both characters fans of Connelly will be familiar with—Haller’s half-brother Harry Bosch is actually the subject of his own series of books by Connelly. Like Grisham, Connelly manages to write courtroom scenes in a way that turns even routine procedures into page-turning scenes.
Rounding out this legal suspense trio is I Heard That Song Before (2007), by Mary Higgins Clark. When she was a child, Kay Lansing—the daughter of a gardener who worked on an estate owned by the Carrington family—overheard a suspicious exchange involving desperation and blackmail. Now 28 years old, Kay returns to the estate to ask a favor of its present owner, Peter Carrington, and finds herself falling in love with him. But Peter has a shady past, having been suspected of involvement with the death of a teenage girl years before, not to mention the death of his pregnant wife some time later. As the accusations unfold, Kay struggles with the faith she has in her husband on the one hand and a gnawing sense of doubt on the other. Ultimately, she learns that finding the truth might mean putting herself in significant danger. While Clark’s formula may feel familiar to her avid fans, it will most likely keep you guessing until the very end.

Sycamore Row, The Reversal, and I Heard That Song Before are all available to borrow at E.P. Foster Library. You can also access NoveList Plus from our eLibrary’s Reading Suggestions section. If the book you are interested in is not currently on the shelf at your branch, you can always request a copy either in-person, over the phone, or online through our catalog.


Woven together by Ronald Martin.

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